Architect's dresscode - My experience as an architectural intern

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valencia something fashion blogger spain influencer streetstyle outfits workplace architecture intern job interview what to wear

When I entered Architecture at the Polytechnic University of Valencia back in 2012, my vision of architects and designers was pretty limited. Back then, the vision of the architect as a demigod capable of all things was still extended, surrounded by nothing but confusion, ego and sort of a mystical curtain that covered everything related to the job. Today, I can say I've got to discover that architecture and professions between the creative and the technical fields have no greater mystery than any other. At the end of the day, we develop our tasks as any other would do: we draw and sketch, both at the computer or freehand; we build scale models (which usually means getting dirty with huge amounts of glue and sticky cardboard), we have our rush moments when finishing anything (specially when printing) and we can handle both paperwork or on-site work. It's not that complicated, and not as surrounded of mysticism as some still wants us to stick to.

And that, as always on this blog, includes the fashion side of the matter! Whilst on a first sight it looks like we architects and architecture students only wear black and dull outfits, we actually don't! Truth is that we are expected to look neat and classy most of the times (to meet our clients; to attend meetings, conventions and lectures; to get prizes if we're lucky enough to win any *wink*) but no further than what is expected of anyone in a regular work environment. Through the years at the Architecture School I've experienced first hand the architect's basic dress code, and, sorry to disappoint you and break all your expectations but, only the 5% of architecture students wear the so-known head to toe black outfit. Then, there's this humble servant of you who is keen on scandalizing the whole institution wearing colorful floral dresses, leopard print and the boldest of pink shades on a daily basis.

Ok. Jokes aside. What I have realized at the school, and at the architect's events I've had the chance to attend is that we are pretty basic when it comes to clothing. There's no much risk, and people is not likely to overdo it when it comes to their outfit. Most of the time, there is a lack in bright colors, there are not big patterns, and minimal, boxed shapes are in 365 days a year at an architect's closet. As an architectural intern having the chance to work on an studio for the second time (yay!) this Summer season, I'm finally glad to say that looks like things are changing slowly on the way we wear and express ourselves through fashion in the world of architecture. Although I don't have any particular dress code at the office, nor I had the past Summer, there are some guidelines I've taken when applying/working on a creative-technical environment as an architecture office while keeping my own personal style:

#1 Play with volumes and shapes
Specially in Summer, when you are not supposed to wear strappy or very showy tops or blouses to the workplace, but still, you are dying because it's 40ºC outside. Instead, wear loose shirts with light asymmetric skirts, play with draped patterns, loose sleeves and high waists with crop tops. This way you'll differentiate yourself from others at the workplace and also and most important, stay comfortable and professional.

#2 Avoid enclosing your feet in tight shoes
Avoid high heels and flip flops if possible too. Our feet tend to get bigger in Summer, so wearing tight shoes will cause you not only a feet slaughter once you get home (believe me: I'm the #1 specialist at that), but also, may even cause you walk weirdly as a result of discomfort. Instead, try wedges, strappy sandals or trainers made out of light fabrics, as Chucks, Vans or Victoria's just to name a few!

#3 Lighter makeup or no-makeup when possible
It's no secret that I like to wear makeup. Like, a LOT. It makes me feel more confident, and putting red lipstick at the beginning of my workday is like an energy boost worth ten coffee cups. But make up gets cakey at the end of the day, especially in humid, Summer Spanish days. As I don't like to step out of home without any makeup at all covering my blemishes and acne marks, when for workdays, I like to put on some face primer before everything else, and cut down the quantity of makeup foundation to the lowest possible. Using waterproof eyeliners and mascara (I just use the first) may help too.

#4 Under no circumstance follow my example on this outfit post
Don't wear your clothes wrinkled! This skirt is super comfortable, light, flowy and amazing but it's made of a fabric which no matter how hard you iron it, tends to get wrinkled at the blink of an eye. It looks the worst!

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valencia something fashion blogger spain influencer streetstyle outfits workplace architecture intern job interview what to wear
I was wearing:

Local store wedges
Mise en Dior earrings
Whistle necklace from Bohemismo
Bimba & Lola wrap skirt
Mango crop top

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valencia something fashion blogger spain influencer streetstyle outfits workplace architecture intern job interview what to wear_0364 copia

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About Amanda

About [span]me[/span]

Hi! I'm Amanda, from Valencia (Spain).

I like all things vintage and classy. I study Architecture and I'm an epée fencer.



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